Tag: Mountain Rose Herbs

January 7, 2015   Posted by: sageadmin

Heal and Support your Kidneys This Winter with Nettle Seeds

Are you feeling tired? Drained to the bone? Noticing signs of dryness in your hair, teeth, nails? Then you might be a good candidate for nettle seeds.

nettleseeds

image from mapletrueheart.blogspot.com

Nettle seeds can rebuild and restore the kidneys. They are a great source of nutrition, vitamins and minerals and are considered an adaptogen and adrenal trophorestorative.

According to Winston and Kuhn in their book, Herbal Therapy & Supplements, an adaptogen is “a substance that helps a living organism adapt to stress (environmental, physical, or psychological).”

A trophorestorative is “an herb that nourishes, strengthens, and tonifies a specific organ or function. Considered ‘food for the organ’. Hawthorn, with its specificity for the heart and circulatory system, is a cardiovascular trophorestorative. Examples: fresh oat (nervous system), nettle seed (kidney).”

To use nettle seeds, consider sprinkling them on everything you eat. For  stronger effect, grind them in a coffee or herb grinder and sprinkle on your food.

A little can go a long way, and we encourage you to start small and build your use to a level that supports your energy levels without making you feel jittery or wired.

Let us know what you think or what questions you have!

 

Further Reading/Resources:

http://bearmedicineherbals.com/every-woman%E2%80%99s-adaptogen-nettle-seeds-the-adrenals.html

http://www.herbcraft.org/nettles%20oats%20and%20you.pdf

http://crabappleherbs.com/blog/2008/09/15/eat-your-herbs-nettle-salt/

January 7, 2015   Posted by: sageadmin

How to make your own herbal infusions

On the left: an infusion of cinnamon, astragalus root, burdock root, and stinging nettle leaf. On the right: nettle seeds in a spice jar. Photo credit: Tanuja JagernauthOn the left: an infusion of cinnamon, astragalus root, burdock root, and stinging nettle leaf. On the right: nettle seeds in a spice jar. Photo credit: Tanuja Jagernauth

On the left: an infusion of cinnamon, astragalus root, burdock root, and stinging nettle leaf. On the right: nettle seeds in a spice jar. Photo credit: Tanuja Jagernauth

Making herbal infusions is an easy, affordable, and fun way to infuse (get it? hehe!) your day with wellness!

Materials:

1 wide-mouthed quart-sized Mason jar

boiling water

herbs of your choice!

How to do it:

Place your chosen herbs into your Mason jar. Place up to a total of 1 cup of herbs in your jar. The more herbs you include, the stronger and possibly more bitter your brew will be, so start with smaller amounts and build until you have the right flavor and strength.

Pour the boiling water into the jar, covering the herbs and taking care not to burn yourself! Screw the lid on and let it steep overnight. Strain when you are ready to drink it, and add honey and/or lemon to taste. Enjoy throughout the following day!

Some herbs to consider in your infusions during the winter:

astragalus root: builds Qi and supports immunity

burdock root: has a wide variety of uses!

cinnamon sticks: promotes circulation, regulates blood sugar, tastes awesome, and can help fight off the early stages of a cold

clove: warms the interior, promotes circulation

ginger: promotes digestion, reduces nausea, can help fight off the early stages of a cold, warms the interior

roses buds: lifts the spirits, promotes compassion and self love

stinging nettle leaves: has a wide variety of uses!

And so many more!

Additional reading/considerations:

1. Check out this blog post from Susan Weed on making herbal infusions: http://www.susunweed.com/How_to_make_Infusions.htm

2. HAVE FUN! Getting to know and live with herbs is a joyous and empowering process. Let your knowledge of herbs that work with your wellness goals build over time, like a friendship.

3. Get creative! Curious about an herb’s properties as they manifest in your body? Make an infusion! As you sip it throughout the day notice how your body responds. If you have any allergic or adverse reaction, discontinue use immediately.

4. Build community! Make and share your infusions with friends and and loved ones!

5. Source your herbs from a trusted place if you live in the city. Be very careful and consult a trusted human or written guide if you are foraging for your herbs. The folks at Sage love Mountain Rose Herbs for stuff we cannot find at the Dill Pickle or our local botanica.

6. Reach out! Email Sage if you have questions or want more suggestions and set up a herbal consultation for an in-depth strategy session.

February 10, 2014   Posted by: sageadmin

Make Your Own Fire Cider!

firecidersmall1

Make Your Own Fire Cider!

From the Mountain Rose Blog! “Fire Cider is a traditional cold remedy with deep roots in folk medicine. The tasty combination of vinegar infused with powerful immune-boosting, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, decongestant, and spicy circulatory movers makes this recipe especially pleasant and easy to incorporate into your daily diet to help boost the immune system, stimulate digestion, and get you nice and warmed up on cold days.”

Ingredients

1/2 cup fresh grated organic ginger root

1/2 cup fresh grated organic horseradish root

1 medium organic onion, chopped

10 cloves of organic garlic, crushed or chopped

2 organic jalapeno peppers, chopped

Zest and juice from 1 organic lemon

Several sprigs of fresh organic rosemary or 2 tbsp of dried rosemary leaves

1 tbsp organic turmeric powder

organic apple cider vinegar

raw local honey to taste

Directions

Prepare all of your cold-fighting roots, fruits, and herbs and place them in a quart sized jar. If you’ve never grated fresh horseradish, be prepared for a powerful sinus opening experience! Use a piece of natural parchment paper or wax paper under the lid to keep the vinegar from touching the metal. Shake well! Store in a dark, cool place for one month and remember to shake daily.

After one month, use cheesecloth to strain out the pulp, pouring the vinegar into a clean jar. Be sure to squeeze as much of the liquid goodness as you can from the pulp while straining. Next, comes the honey! Add 1/4 cup of honey and stir until incorporated. Taste your cider and add another 1/4 cup until you reach the desired sweetness.

Ingredient Variations

These herbs and spices would make a wonderful addition to your Fire Cider creations: ThymeCayenneRosehipsGinseng, Orange, Grapefruit, Schizandra berriesAstragalusParsleyBurdockOreganoPeppercorns

- See more at: http://mountainroseblog.com/fire-cider/#sthash.9Z1Cr5tF.dpuf