Tag: healing justice

April 16, 2015   Posted by: sageadmin

Acknowledging Cultural Appropriation Within Our Practice of Traditional East Asian Medicine

Sage Community Health Collective has created a statement on cultural appropriation as part of our ongoing learning and healing process and as part of our commitment to the practice of healing justice.

We humbly offer this statement with the acknowledgement that we are a collective work in process. This represents where our collective analysis is at this moment in time. We hope that those who read this will offer feedback and ideas as we all continue on our individual and collective healing journeys.

At Sage Community Health Collective, part of our healing justice work includes but is not limited to providing individual health and healing services. Our individual and community health and healing work is rooted in Traditional East Asian Medicine (TEAM), a system of healing rooted in centuries-old practices from China, Tibet, India, Japan, Korea, and Thailand.

TEAM encompasses and includes the practice of acupuncture, moxibustion, gua sha, cupping, bodywork, herbal medicine, nutrition counseling and holistic lifestyle strategizing. Rooted in Taoist spirituality, shamanism, and Confucianism, TEAM also includes the practices of meditation, Tai Ji, and Qi Gong.

One of us traces her ancestry back to India, but none of us trace our ancestors back to China, Tibet, Japan, Korea, or Thailand. Because we are Americans who studied at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, a private for-profit college, we acknowledge that we were taught a commodified form of TEAM known as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

TCM is the form of TEAM that Chairman Mao created by distilling centuries of Chinese village-based healing practices into a product fit for export to the West. TCM, as it was sold to and often practiced in the West deemphasized practices that were considered spiritual, superstitious and “backward”. This included many of the Taoist and other kinds of spiritual practices that form the very foundation of TEAM.

We would like to acknowledge the many teachers who did their best to transmit to us the spirit of this medicine within the private for-profit walls of our alma mater.

In this statement, with great humility, we acknowledge the forms that our practice currently takes, and we commit to moving forward with greater respect for the roots of this powerful medicine.

We give thanks to Nisha Ahuja for the powerful video, “You Are Here: Exploring Yoga and the Impacts of Cultural Appropriation”. In it they reference the groundbreaking work on colonization and decolonization by Poka Laeuni and outline several strategies for addressing cultural appropriation in our practices. We have paraphrased them here:

1. Approach your practice with humbleness and humility.

2. Acknowledge where your practice comes from and from whom it comes.

3. Acknowledge the aspects of your practice that you are and are not sharing.

4. Recognize your impact in spaces, being aware of your power and privilege. Ask questions about who is in the room and who is not.
5. Build real relationships with people who are different from you without tokenizing them.

6. Acknowledge where the sacred objects in your space come from.

7. Be accountable with your use of Sanskrit and all sacred languages, acknowledging mispronunciations and what you do not know.

 

With gratitude and curiosity, we contemplated these strategies and would like to share some additional acknowledgements and commitments we would like to make as we continue our work as TEAM practitioners.

 

1. Approach your practice with humbleness and humility.

We humbly practice Traditional East Asian Medicine and acknowledge that even with our certificates and degrees, there is so much about this medicine and East Asian history and culture that we do not know. There is so much for us to learn and continue practicing. Part of what drew us to this medicine was that we knew it would challenge us to learn and grow throughout our careers and lives.

We recognize that none of us trace our ancestors back to China, Japan, or Korea, and therefore we rely on English translations of ancient textbooks, scrolls, and other records in order to learn the concepts of TEAM.

Translation is a highly political act. We acknowledge that in our educations we may have missed subtle nuances that may have been literally lost in the translation.

In our practice of TEAM at Sage Community Health Collective, we aspire to rectify some of the  power dynamics that are often unexamined within the practice and education of TCM/TEAM.

Our mission reads as follows:

    • to create a non-hierarchical worker owned collective committed to community wellness

    • to challenge systemic health disparities and the traditional patient/practitioner dynamic

    • to provide affordable, accessible, trauma-informed and harm-reductionist healing services including acupuncture, herbs, bodywork, and nutritional counseling

    • to facilitate the pursuit of community and individual wellness via workshops and skillshares in partnership with community members, activists, and freedom fighters

We hope that by practicing our mission and infusing each session with trauma sensitivity, harm reduction, and body positivity we may give this medicine back to the people and poor, working-class communities for whom this kind of medicine was originally created and by whom it was always practiced.

 

2. Acknowledge where your practice comes from and from whom it comes.

Most of our practices come from China and the many different cultures, locations, and practices that informed Traditional Chinese Medicine. While we are not Maoists, we consider ourselves part of the Barefoot Doctor lineage, created in Maoist China.

At the same time, our bodywork and healing modalities and systems of medicine travelled along the Silk Route, so all of the practices that were shared and exchanged as they passed from family to family and healer to healer, inevitably morphed and continued to be shared with different cultures. Therefore, in some cases, it is difficult to pinpoint the direct origin of a specific practice, and we see certain practices expressed differently in different regions of Asia today.

The bottom line is that we were all trained at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, a private, for-profit Western institution teaching Eastern Medicine by mostly white, American practitioners.

It is important to state that the curriculum did not rigorously emphasize the importance of the history and lineage of these 5000 year old practices. Therefore, we recognize the necessity of learning more about the roots of our medicine and deepening the authenticity of our practices.

 

3. Acknowledge the aspects of your practice that you are and are not sharing.

At Sage Community Health Collective, none of us identify as Taoists, shamans, or Confucians and do not have in-depth knowledge of each of these rich traditions; therefore, we make the choice to not speak as experts about the spiritual roots of the form of TEAM that we practice.

In general, we aspire to reduce the stigma and stereotypes about TCM/TEAM as being connected to religious dogma, and this raises an important question: for whose benefit are we adapting this medicine. Whose sensibilities are we protecting in erasing entire schools of thought as we practice this medicine? In fact, are we participating in racism, white supremacy, and cultural ethnocentrism by erasing the spiritual roots of this medicine from our practices? This is something we will continue discussing and exploring as we continue to deepen and expand our analysis.

As a challenge to TCM and TEAM, we challenge the gender binaries we often see in TCM language. In general, we challenge language that is not body positive or that is rooted in white supremacy, Eurocentrism, patriarchy, homophobia, transphobia, and violence.

We try to use transformative language as much as we can to express our values and counter oppression, promoting social justice, healing justice, and liberation.

 

4. Recognize your impact in spaces, being aware of your power and privilege. Ask questions about who is in the room and who is not.

Since Sage Community Health Collective opened in May 2011, we have asked ourselves questions about who accesses our services and who does not. We have been continuously engaged in holding focus groups with community members and have been participating in an ongoing Participatory Evaluation Research process, asking who is coming in to Sage, who we serve beyond the walls of Sage, and what obstacles prevent folks from coming to Sage for services. As a result, we have been able to discuss and address some of the identified obstacles, but we are always in the process of learning and adapting to the needs of our communities. We do not do this work alone and in a vacuum. We need our communities to show up for us, push back on us, and lovingly hold us the way we aspire to hold our communities and each other.

We do our best to share power within our collective and with our clients and communities. We do our best to honor the wisdom and complex humanity of those within our collective and those who come for services or to our workshops.

In our individual sessions, we affirm each person’s right to consent to treatment or refuse treatment at any time. We see ourselves as facilitators of a process led by the client/patient, and we root each of our sessions in trauma sensitivity, harm reduction, and body positivity.

All of our workshops are done in popular education style. We begin them by listening, asking people about their own experiences first. We do our best to honor each person’s unique beliefs and traditions, and we do our best to not ascribe or prescribe what self and community care should look like.

The work of collective liberation requires all of our engagement. It is our work to make sure that more of us can bring more of ourselves to the table and stay in the movements we so desperately need.

 

5. Build real relationships with people who are different from you without tokenizing them.

As anti-capitalist business owners, we put people before profit. Our practices are rooted in relationships.

We hold a complex, thriving space that is racially, economically, and culturally diverse. With this diversity come many opportunities for healing and transformative dialogue.

When conflict happens at Sage, we utilize our grievance policy and transformative justice practices as applications of our anti-oppression values and our collective belief that no one is disposable.

Our white practitioners actively engage their whiteness as a political and cultural orientation and are actively working on addressing the impacts of white supremacy and internalized racism on their beings and practices.

Our practitioners of color are engaged in addressing their own internalized white supremacy, actively acknowledging their own power and privileges, and they have developed their own practices of addressing the impacts of colonization and racism in their lives and practices.

Collectively we dedicate our work to movements for Black, POC, trans*/gender-non-conforming, and indigenous liberation, healing justice, and prison abolition. We support and have relationships with individuals and organizations all over the city led by young people and trans*/GNC, BIPOC folks striving for collective healing and transformation.

We want to acknowledge that our Black, Indigenous, POC, and queer/trans*/GNC patients and practitioners of color do unfortunately experience various kinds of micro-aggressions at Sage. As a result, we are trying to raise awareness amongst one another and with our clients about how micro-aggressions negatively impact the individual, the collective, and the work we do here at Sage. We will be releasing literature about micro-aggressions in the clinical setting and how to address them. Stay tuned to our newsletter and our website for more information!

 

6. Acknowledge where the sacred objects in your space come from.

At Sage Community Health Collective, we have gifts and items in the space that come from different cultures that are connected to our own personal histories and paths. Ask us about them if you are curious!

We want to acknowledge that we are called Sage. In our opinion, the name Sage represents the intentions behind our mission, work, and organizing principles.

We see our clients and patients as Sages. We are here to support the manifestation of their bodies’ innate wisdom.

We are aware that Sage burning comes from many different indigenous practices. We burn Sage in our space to shift and clear the energy. When we burn Sage at our space, it is not done with the intention of connecting to or co-opting Native American spiritual practices.

While our ancestors used Sage for healing and in their ceremonial practices, we learned the practice of saging at in Chicago at Stone Soup Housing Cooperative. We acknowledge that we did not create this practice and that we inherited it from white people practicing appropriation of Native American spiritual practices.

To honor the spirit of Sage, we regularly acknowledge it and offer our gratitude for the tenacity, healing, and resilience it grants us on a regular basis.

 

7. Be accountable with your use of Sanskrit and all sacred languages, acknowledging mispronunciations and what you do not know.

As Sage Community Health Collective, we do our best to use accessible terms, but sometimes we use words from our TCM/TEAM training, which can include Latin, pin yin, anatomical terms, terms from Ayurveda, and more.

We most often use language from our training that is pin yin. Pin yin is the Westernized version of Chinese characters. Very often, with this translation, the subtle and nuanced aspects of the Chinese language is appropriated and misrepresented, and so much history and meaning is lost. We acknowledge that we may be pronouncing pin yin in ways that change the meaning of the words we intend to use. We acknowledge and mourn this erasure of history, culture, and meaning.

We ask for the patience of our clients, teachers, and ancestors as we attempt to communicate in liberatory ways about healing, a phenomenon that often exists on a plane where words are at once inadequate and limitlessly powerful.

THANK YOU for reading this statement and for all you do to further the work of healing and transformative movements for liberation. As always, we welcome your feedback, questions, and ideas!

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August 2, 2014   Posted by: sageadmin

Celebrating Beauty in Other Cultures

beauty.sin.apropiacion

For the month of August, Sage Community Health Collective is asking ourselves and our community some questions to start a longer dialogue about culture, cultural appropriation, and cultural exchange. How would you answer the question posed here? How do you celebrate beauty in other cultures without being appropriative? #dialogueishealing

You can write us your response at sagecommunityhealth [at] gmail [dot] com or write up your response the next time you are at our clinic!

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August 2, 2014   Posted by: sageadmin

Honoring Our Roots

honor.roots

For the month of August, Sage Community Health Collective is asking ourselves and our community some questions to start some dialogue about culture, cultural appropriation, and cultural exchange. How would you answer the question posed here? How might we honor our own roots while discontinuing oppressive “traditions”? #dialogueishealing

You can write us your response at sagecommunityhealth [at] gmail [dot] com or write up your response the next time you are at our clinic!

 

 

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August 2, 2014   Posted by: sageadmin

Where Are Your People From?

For the month of August, Sage Community Health Collective is asking ourselves and our community some questions to start some dialogue about culture, cultural appropriation, and cultural exchange. How would you answer the question, “Where are your people from?” #dialogueishealing

You can write us your response at sagecommunityhealth [at] gmail [dot] com or write up your response the next time you are at our clinic!

people

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March 9, 2014   Posted by: sageadmin

Call for Participation! AMC 2014 Healing Justice Practice Space

Dear healing justice community,

This call for participation and place to apply for this years’ Healing Justice Practice Space at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit happening from June 19-22nd. Please share it with your communities, networks, and people who you think would be interested in volunteering!

We look forward to hearing from you!
the 2014 HJPS coordinators
HealingTree

Hello Amazing Healers, Practitioners, and Organizers!

We are seeking your participation in the Healing Justice Practice Space at the 2014 Allied Media Conference (AMC), June 19-22nd. The AMC will take place on the campus of Wayne State University in Detroit, MI, and the HJPS will be held within the McGregor Conference Center.

Bring your and your community’s brilliance to the 2014 HJPS! Spread the word to other fabulous healers, health practitioners, and healing justice activists.

We’re cultivating space for people to receive healing, feel educated and empowered to keep healing themselves, and be inspired to share healing their communities.

Click here to apply to be part of the 2014 Healing Justice Practice Space!

Your response is due by April 18, 2014.

YOU CAN VOLUNTEER AS A…

  • Healer/Practitioner

  • Space Keeper

  • Point Person

  • any combination of these roles

Practitioners & Healers will work in 1.5 hour shifts, working with the AMC community in experiencing healing practices and addressing health concerns. We’re excited to receive applications from all kinds of practitioners and healers. Some of the offerings at the Healing Justice Practice Space since its beginnings in 2011 have included:

  • -herbalism

  • -reiki

  • -massage

  • -acupuncture

  • -yoga

  • -energy and bodywork

  • -crisis counseling

  • -first aid

  • -nutritional counseling

  • -dance/movement

  • -somatic therapy

  • -art and sound therapy

  • -full spectrum doula support

Space Keepers will manage the sign-up schedule for people wishing to see practitioners and healers, maintain a safe space, support the practitioners and healers in their practice, ensure access to the space for attendees, and help troubleshoot other issues if they arise. They will also need to feel comfortable answering questions about healing modalities being offered in the space. We are asking space keepers to work 1.5 hour shifts. Patient, organized folks are essential in these roles, and help keep the space wonderful.

Point People are the go-to folks who help hold down the HJPS for 3-4 hour shifts. They communicate and troubleshoot with practitioners and healers, the space keepers, as well as the other volunteers and staff outside of the HJPS who are responsible for coordinating the AMC. Point people must be in or near the practice space throughout their shift, and on-call for supporting the needs of practitioners and healers.

EXPECTATIONS OF VOLUNTEERS…

  • Attend a conference call/online orientation this Spring, or the in-person orientation at the AMC.

  • Be on time and stay for the duration of your shift.

  • Have clear communication with the HJPS coordinators about your needs.

  • Sign up to receive one session of healing for yourself.

WHAT WE CAN OFFER TO VOLUNTEERS………

A very limited number of waived registrations will be available to practitioners, healers and point people who would not otherwise be able to attend. We cannot offer waived registration to all volunteers this year. Please indicate on your application whether you will need a travel scholarship (all volunteers) and/or a waived registration (practitioners, healers and point people only). All volunteers may register at the scholarship rate of $55 for the conference. All HJPS volunteers (including practitioners and healers) will be eligible for free transportation from and to the airport.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN IN THE SPACE THIS YEAR?

We will hold a shared space for pracitioners and healers to offer individual and group sessions. We encourage proposals for one-on-one sessions as well as for group sessions such as yoga, movement, acupuncture, meditation, and sound-based practices. We will provide some supples such as: lamps, adjustable dividers for each room that will be available for healers and practitioners to use for setting up their space for sessions, and yoga props such as mats, blankets, straps and bolsters.

Applications can be sent to: hjps.coordinators@gmail.com by April 18, 2014. Applications are reviewed by a national advisory committee drawn from the Disability Justice, Transformative Justice, and Healing/Health Justice communities that participate and have participated in the AMC. Please be detailed in your responses in describing how solid and amazing your practice is. You will hear back from us by the first week of May. Please let us know in your application on how much space you will need, and if there are certain supplies you need that you are unable to bring with you.

Although there will not be a Healing Justice Network Gathering this year, we are seeking planning and coordination support for organizing a healing justice gathering that will be happening onThursday, June 19th in Detroit. If you would like to be part of organizing the pre-AMC gathering, contact Peggy Hong, at: kwisuk63@gmail.com. We acknowledge that past dinners, caucuses, and network gatherings have been valuable spaces to continue to build healing justice community networks during the time of the AMC, so we are looking for additional support to make the pre-AMC healing justice gathering happen!

We appreciate you, your wisdom and gifts, and look forward to collaborating.

In community,

Holly, Tanuja, Peggy, TK, Jardana, and Carmen

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October 20, 2012   Posted by: sagepage

“I want my people with me”: a letter to B from anonymous

Hi Community! In order to continue the rich and important dialogue about self care and community care, here is another heartfelt and loving response to B Loewe’s article, “An End to Self Care”.

What questions and thoughts does this conversation raise for you? Write to us in the comments below or at sagecommunityhealth@gmail.com

Hi B—

I love you a lot, and I told you I wanted to write a letter to you because what I want to talk about I don’t talk about on the internet and in public, but since this is a community conversation, I’m going to have Sage post this (thanks, Sage!) so it can be a part of that, because…well, it seems important, and I’ve talked with lots of my best people who give a fuck about ‘the movement’ about it so it seems like a public response makes more sense.

I wanted to think about what you wrote for a few days, because I try to make a practice of remembering that when I am totally confused about something, it’s worth considering that I’m not thinking about it fully. Because the first thing I thought when I read what you wrote was: whatever this movement is, it’s not one that includes my body.  That’s not really a new feeling, but it’s one that I didn’t expect to get provoked from you.  

As someone that’s had to fight (because of abuse, survivorship, assimilation/racism/cultural erasure, queerness, femmeness, and recently because of degenerative illness) for the notion that I have a self (I mean really.  It took until I was…20 or so before I could think about myself as anything but some thoughts floating in space, and it’s not as if that one is resolved), much less that it was valuable beyond what I do and provide for other people (Shira Hassan blew my mind when I was about 24 and she started talking about how ‘you’re worth more than what you provide’—I mean, I had not thought about that, and about how hierarchy and history taught me the exact opposite), and then again that this self I had was worth taking care of—these things were and are huge for me.  And all of that is not nearly done unless I am really lying to myself that day.
Hearing the notion that focusing my attention on caring for self is a bad thing feels like eleven steps back. That if my values were properly aligned I’d be able to work steady 18 hour days with no problem. When I do that, and sometimes I have to, I’m impacted for weeks.  And really, hearing that if I was doing it right/in the right organization/in the right community I could/should be able to have unending time and psychic commitment because that would be enough, or that it is enough for someone else and that person’s life is the life I should strive for, well…maybe that’s not actually new, and it’s sure as hell not true for me. 

I know other people have remarked on the knitting thing, but I think it’s probably worth saying that no one says ‘we’re not going to screen print and graffiti and spoken word our way to a revolution’—I mean, maybe people do, but I know the organization you work for uses media stuff (rightly, powerfully, and effectively) to get its message across.  When I knit (or make any of the other stuff I make) I am sending messages.  

I do it to use my body in ways that are important for me to try to preserve, to connect with the beautiful artist parts of my abusive bitch of a grandmother, to wrap my friends and loved ones in warmth, to let them know that I care about them.  And that I care about them looking as fabulous as I know they are.  To try to be the way I want to in the world.  And really, I know you and I both want to live in a world where creating and making art (insert Emma Goldman about revolution and dancing) is important and central—I know for sure you believe this, so what are you attacking, exactly?

And maybe because we’re not in the same city any more, and what we’re doing is so different, maybe you didn’t address this article to me and mine, because the people in my communities will break their faces open to help their own people, but spending a moment on themselves is usually last on the list.  This notion that we should be assisting people with whatever their struggles are so that they can do whatever they need to do?  I feel like that’s what I do (and all my people do) all the time, and always have done. I can think of four examples in my personal life this week.  I think that’s what community care is?  I’m committed to that because our lives depend on it…but, I also need to do stuff that’s not for other people.  

I’ve chosen to focus on cardiovascular strength so that if I wake up tomorrow and my legs aren’t working in the way I’m accustomed to, I can have a head start on rehab.  I’m seriously focused on managing stress better because right now the MRI of my brain looks fucked the fuck up, and I want to do whatever the hell I can to help my body stop attacking itself, because isn’t the whole point of having a movement so that we can all work less, have our needs met, and have the right to our own lives and bodies?  And yes—I have access to medical care, I can attempt to make these kinds of plans, that is for sure a privileged position relative to lots of my people, but I don’t see how ignoring my own body does anyone but abusers any good.

But just to reiterate, I don’t want any part of any movement, any job, any life that involves a single pursuit to which everything is devoted.  Certainly I don’t want endless work, I don’t care what the work is. If that’s what the vision is, let me officially turn in my card.
I know the way I’m feeling is because I’ve chosen to pursue training where I get looked at like I am from Mars constantly, and where people’s unquestioned privilege and worship of power are constant.  And so, I think I am doing movement work, but it doesn’t seem like I am within your framing.  Because my work feels one on one, it feels like providing a healing perspective in a place where that usually doesn’t happen.  It’s about challenging what people think about chronic pain, about drug use and drug users, and about the medical care that people (people of color, poor people, fat people, undocumented people, people with disabilities, queer people, all of the above) deserve.  It is certainly in the most fucked up of structures.  It is about getting state sanctioned permission to do something that no one in my family or in my life does, because I want us all to have access to holistic top quality medical care, and I’m egotistical enough to think I can be a part of doing it better.  All of that while hiding who I am and who my communities are for my own self-preservation.  Hell, my name isn’t on this because I don’t want the people that I’m around to know that these are my experiences when I’m inevitably googled for some thing or another.

Do you really want everyone to be doing the same thing?  Working in the same way?  Do we all have to reach a level of movement purity before we count as doing it right?  That can’t be what you meant, but it sure as hell feels like what you said.
And so I want a movement that welcomes me in, whatever my capacity is.  I want a harm reduction movement that recognizes that people do what they can, and engages everyone where they’re at.  I have the history that I have, I have the body that I have, I’ve chosen the work that I’ve chosen (and understand the privilege of that), but comparing what I’m doing to what anyone else is doing is a losing game for sure.  I already have several communities of care, for which I am thankful.  I need everyone to let me have time for healing, time for rest, and time for doing nothing even remotely productive.  I want a movement that values all of the above—complexity above purity, multiplicity above absolutes—because I want my people with me, including you.
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September 29, 2012   Posted by: sagepage

Recipes for Living in Intentional Community

We found this beautiful quote from one of our allies, Adaku Utah, and we just had to share it! Enjoy!

“Community is a sustainable, accountable, anti-oppressive, non-violent, mutually supportive, safe and ever-evolving collective of earth, minds, bodies, energies and spirits grounded in love, compassion, openness, shared understanding, trust, responsible communication and commitment to shared intentional time and space to transform ourselves, the community and the world.”

To read more and check out SouLar Bliss, go to: http://www.soularbliss.com/2011/12/13/recipes-for-living-in-intentional-community/

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October 24, 2011   Posted by: sageadmin

Happy Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Day!

The Sage team is celebrating by continuing to offer affordable, effective, trauma-informed, harm reductionist, holistic treatment to YOU and your community.

Help us to spread the word by sharing our information with your folks, and we look forward to seeing you at our space soon!

More information about Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Day can be found on the AOM Day website: www.aomday.org.

no comments posted in: bodywork   |   healing justice   |   other resources   |   services   |   traditional chinese medicine
October 1, 2011   Posted by: sageadmin

October and November Workshops and Events!

Chicago! You want to sit up and pay attention to Sage’s exciting list of events and workshops for the month of October and beginning of November. Please contact us to RSVP.

All workshops will be happening at our beautiful space at 2514 W. Armitage Avenue #205, Chicago, IL, 60647.

QuickBooks 101 for Healers
This workshop is for practitioners who want to learn about and/or improve their basic business accounting skills. Learn how to effectively navigate the latest version of QuickBooks with expert accountant and Chinese Medicine practitioner Nicole Andrus.
Date: Tuesday, October 11       Time: 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Cost: $25-50 sliding scale      
Note: *Please RSVP by October 4th to reserve a spot*
Moxibustion Workshop
Learn how to apply Moxibustion to yourself, and if you are a healer to your clients, for various common ailments. Moxibustion is an ancient tool that is great for warming channels and points, keeping up your natural defenses, and moving qi and blood.
Date: Thursday, October 20       Time: 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Cost: $25-50 sliding scale      
Trauma Care for Bodyworkers Roundtable
Learn how to provide basic trauma care for patients. To honor the expert in all of us we will be sharing stories of our experiences and discussing tips and tools we have used when a client has an emotional release or a triggering moment. Anna Goldberger, licensed therapist, will talk about the basic do’s and don’t for supporting people through trauma.
Date: Thursday, October 27th       Time: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Cost: Suggested Donation: $10-30 (no one turned away)
The 12 Channels of Chinese Medicine, Part 1
Learn the basics of Lung, Large Intestine, Spleen, Stomach, Heart, and Small Intestine channels. Including: tracing each external channel, acupressure tips, how to stretch the channel, and Food is Medicine tips for each channel.
Date: Sunday, November 6th       Time: 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Cost: $20-50 sliding scale
TCM Strategies for Abdominal Health
We will cover the channels that enter the abdomen, which is known as your hara. The hara is your center and contains your entire history. We will discuss what foods and herbs to use to prevent and treat common disorders, plus self massage/acupressure and stretching for the channels that enter the abdomen.
Date: Thursday, November 10th       Time: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Cost: $20-40 sliding scale
August 23, 2011   Posted by: sageadmin

Moving Toward the Ugly: Toward a Politic Beyond Desirability

Link: Moving Toward the Ugly: Toward a Politic Beyond Desirability

A must read article from Mia Mingus that breaks down the intersections of gender, disability justice, and healing justice. So well written we had to share! Enjoy!

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