Tag: body positivity

January 7, 2015   Posted by: sageadmin

How to make your own herbal infusions

On the left: an infusion of cinnamon, astragalus root, burdock root, and stinging nettle leaf. On the right: nettle seeds in a spice jar. Photo credit: Tanuja JagernauthOn the left: an infusion of cinnamon, astragalus root, burdock root, and stinging nettle leaf. On the right: nettle seeds in a spice jar. Photo credit: Tanuja Jagernauth

On the left: an infusion of cinnamon, astragalus root, burdock root, and stinging nettle leaf. On the right: nettle seeds in a spice jar. Photo credit: Tanuja Jagernauth

Making herbal infusions is an easy, affordable, and fun way to infuse (get it? hehe!) your day with wellness!

Materials:

1 wide-mouthed quart-sized Mason jar

boiling water

herbs of your choice!

How to do it:

Place your chosen herbs into your Mason jar. Place up to a total of 1 cup of herbs in your jar. The more herbs you include, the stronger and possibly more bitter your brew will be, so start with smaller amounts and build until you have the right flavor and strength.

Pour the boiling water into the jar, covering the herbs and taking care not to burn yourself! Screw the lid on and let it steep overnight. Strain when you are ready to drink it, and add honey and/or lemon to taste. Enjoy throughout the following day!

Some herbs to consider in your infusions during the winter:

astragalus root: builds Qi and supports immunity

burdock root: has a wide variety of uses!

cinnamon sticks: promotes circulation, regulates blood sugar, tastes awesome, and can help fight off the early stages of a cold

clove: warms the interior, promotes circulation

ginger: promotes digestion, reduces nausea, can help fight off the early stages of a cold, warms the interior

roses buds: lifts the spirits, promotes compassion and self love

stinging nettle leaves: has a wide variety of uses!

And so many more!

Additional reading/considerations:

1. Check out this blog post from Susan Weed on making herbal infusions: http://www.susunweed.com/How_to_make_Infusions.htm

2. HAVE FUN! Getting to know and live with herbs is a joyous and empowering process. Let your knowledge of herbs that work with your wellness goals build over time, like a friendship.

3. Get creative! Curious about an herb’s properties as they manifest in your body? Make an infusion! As you sip it throughout the day notice how your body responds. If you have any allergic or adverse reaction, discontinue use immediately.

4. Build community! Make and share your infusions with friends and and loved ones!

5. Source your herbs from a trusted place if you live in the city. Be very careful and consult a trusted human or written guide if you are foraging for your herbs. The folks at Sage love Mountain Rose Herbs for stuff we cannot find at the Dill Pickle or our local botanica.

6. Reach out! Email Sage if you have questions or want more suggestions and set up a herbal consultation for an in-depth strategy session.

October 20, 2012   Posted by: sagepage

“I want my people with me”: a letter to B from anonymous

Hi Community! In order to continue the rich and important dialogue about self care and community care, here is another heartfelt and loving response to B Loewe’s article, “An End to Self Care”.

What questions and thoughts does this conversation raise for you? Write to us in the comments below or at sagecommunityhealth@gmail.com

Hi B—

I love you a lot, and I told you I wanted to write a letter to you because what I want to talk about I don’t talk about on the internet and in public, but since this is a community conversation, I’m going to have Sage post this (thanks, Sage!) so it can be a part of that, because…well, it seems important, and I’ve talked with lots of my best people who give a fuck about ‘the movement’ about it so it seems like a public response makes more sense.

I wanted to think about what you wrote for a few days, because I try to make a practice of remembering that when I am totally confused about something, it’s worth considering that I’m not thinking about it fully. Because the first thing I thought when I read what you wrote was: whatever this movement is, it’s not one that includes my body.  That’s not really a new feeling, but it’s one that I didn’t expect to get provoked from you.  

As someone that’s had to fight (because of abuse, survivorship, assimilation/racism/cultural erasure, queerness, femmeness, and recently because of degenerative illness) for the notion that I have a self (I mean really.  It took until I was…20 or so before I could think about myself as anything but some thoughts floating in space, and it’s not as if that one is resolved), much less that it was valuable beyond what I do and provide for other people (Shira Hassan blew my mind when I was about 24 and she started talking about how ‘you’re worth more than what you provide’—I mean, I had not thought about that, and about how hierarchy and history taught me the exact opposite), and then again that this self I had was worth taking care of—these things were and are huge for me.  And all of that is not nearly done unless I am really lying to myself that day.
Hearing the notion that focusing my attention on caring for self is a bad thing feels like eleven steps back. That if my values were properly aligned I’d be able to work steady 18 hour days with no problem. When I do that, and sometimes I have to, I’m impacted for weeks.  And really, hearing that if I was doing it right/in the right organization/in the right community I could/should be able to have unending time and psychic commitment because that would be enough, or that it is enough for someone else and that person’s life is the life I should strive for, well…maybe that’s not actually new, and it’s sure as hell not true for me. 

I know other people have remarked on the knitting thing, but I think it’s probably worth saying that no one says ‘we’re not going to screen print and graffiti and spoken word our way to a revolution’—I mean, maybe people do, but I know the organization you work for uses media stuff (rightly, powerfully, and effectively) to get its message across.  When I knit (or make any of the other stuff I make) I am sending messages.  

I do it to use my body in ways that are important for me to try to preserve, to connect with the beautiful artist parts of my abusive bitch of a grandmother, to wrap my friends and loved ones in warmth, to let them know that I care about them.  And that I care about them looking as fabulous as I know they are.  To try to be the way I want to in the world.  And really, I know you and I both want to live in a world where creating and making art (insert Emma Goldman about revolution and dancing) is important and central—I know for sure you believe this, so what are you attacking, exactly?

And maybe because we’re not in the same city any more, and what we’re doing is so different, maybe you didn’t address this article to me and mine, because the people in my communities will break their faces open to help their own people, but spending a moment on themselves is usually last on the list.  This notion that we should be assisting people with whatever their struggles are so that they can do whatever they need to do?  I feel like that’s what I do (and all my people do) all the time, and always have done. I can think of four examples in my personal life this week.  I think that’s what community care is?  I’m committed to that because our lives depend on it…but, I also need to do stuff that’s not for other people.  

I’ve chosen to focus on cardiovascular strength so that if I wake up tomorrow and my legs aren’t working in the way I’m accustomed to, I can have a head start on rehab.  I’m seriously focused on managing stress better because right now the MRI of my brain looks fucked the fuck up, and I want to do whatever the hell I can to help my body stop attacking itself, because isn’t the whole point of having a movement so that we can all work less, have our needs met, and have the right to our own lives and bodies?  And yes—I have access to medical care, I can attempt to make these kinds of plans, that is for sure a privileged position relative to lots of my people, but I don’t see how ignoring my own body does anyone but abusers any good.

But just to reiterate, I don’t want any part of any movement, any job, any life that involves a single pursuit to which everything is devoted.  Certainly I don’t want endless work, I don’t care what the work is. If that’s what the vision is, let me officially turn in my card.
I know the way I’m feeling is because I’ve chosen to pursue training where I get looked at like I am from Mars constantly, and where people’s unquestioned privilege and worship of power are constant.  And so, I think I am doing movement work, but it doesn’t seem like I am within your framing.  Because my work feels one on one, it feels like providing a healing perspective in a place where that usually doesn’t happen.  It’s about challenging what people think about chronic pain, about drug use and drug users, and about the medical care that people (people of color, poor people, fat people, undocumented people, people with disabilities, queer people, all of the above) deserve.  It is certainly in the most fucked up of structures.  It is about getting state sanctioned permission to do something that no one in my family or in my life does, because I want us all to have access to holistic top quality medical care, and I’m egotistical enough to think I can be a part of doing it better.  All of that while hiding who I am and who my communities are for my own self-preservation.  Hell, my name isn’t on this because I don’t want the people that I’m around to know that these are my experiences when I’m inevitably googled for some thing or another.

Do you really want everyone to be doing the same thing?  Working in the same way?  Do we all have to reach a level of movement purity before we count as doing it right?  That can’t be what you meant, but it sure as hell feels like what you said.
And so I want a movement that welcomes me in, whatever my capacity is.  I want a harm reduction movement that recognizes that people do what they can, and engages everyone where they’re at.  I have the history that I have, I have the body that I have, I’ve chosen the work that I’ve chosen (and understand the privilege of that), but comparing what I’m doing to what anyone else is doing is a losing game for sure.  I already have several communities of care, for which I am thankful.  I need everyone to let me have time for healing, time for rest, and time for doing nothing even remotely productive.  I want a movement that values all of the above—complexity above purity, multiplicity above absolutes—because I want my people with me, including you.
1 comment posted in: awesomeness   |   body positivity   |   disability justice   |   healing justice
September 29, 2012   Posted by: sagepage

Recipes for Living in Intentional Community

We found this beautiful quote from one of our allies, Adaku Utah, and we just had to share it! Enjoy!

“Community is a sustainable, accountable, anti-oppressive, non-violent, mutually supportive, safe and ever-evolving collective of earth, minds, bodies, energies and spirits grounded in love, compassion, openness, shared understanding, trust, responsible communication and commitment to shared intentional time and space to transform ourselves, the community and the world.”

To read more and check out SouLar Bliss, go to: http://www.soularbliss.com/2011/12/13/recipes-for-living-in-intentional-community/

no comments posted in: awesomeness   |   body positivity   |   healing justice   |   other resources   |   quotes   |   resources
August 23, 2011   Posted by: sageadmin

Moving Toward the Ugly: Toward a Politic Beyond Desirability

Link: Moving Toward the Ugly: Toward a Politic Beyond Desirability

A must read article from Mia Mingus that breaks down the intersections of gender, disability justice, and healing justice. So well written we had to share! Enjoy!

no comments posted in: body positivity   |   disability justice   |   healing justice   |   other resources   |   resources
July 25, 2011   Posted by: sageadmin

July 31st: Chunky Dunk!!!

Come join body-positive folks in creating a body-positive space on Lake Michigan. Swimming! Fun! Fierceness! Beach is accessible. Event is free, fun, and open to the public.

Sunday, July 31st, 12-4 pm
Hollywood Beach
5800 N Lakeshore Dr
Chicago, IL

Hollywood Beach — also known as Kathy Osterman Beach or Gay Beach — is located in the Edgewater Neighborhood of North Chicago.

The group is a fierce, fun, informative body positive group started by queers thinking how fat phobia, classism, racism, ableism, homo/transphobia, and sexism intersect and overlap…and how we gotta get LIBERATED from them all!

no comments posted in: body positivity   |   disability justice   |   events   |   healing justice   |   other events