Archive for Uncategorized

January 2, 2016   Posted by: sageadmin

Accessing Affordable Services After Sage Closes

Over the past several years, more and more community acupuncture and projects dedicated to healing, prison abolition, and transformative justice have popped up all over the country and in Chicago.

They are right on time as we face increasing collective challenges in the face of rampant systemic oppression, mass incarceration, and the ravages of late stage capitalism. Many of these projects are asking critical questions about how we value and relate to one another, how we sustainably struggle for social justice, while supporting one another.

Community Acupuncture in Chicago: providing affordable health care services still remains outside of the norm within the acupuncture world. We salute these projects, and others like them, for doing their best to offer holistic health services to those who might normally be priced out of getting acupuncture.

Mercy Community Acupuncture Center
Sessions starting at $30

Five Point Holistic Health

Five Point Holistic Health is offering clients of Sage Community Health Collective one free initial community acupuncture treatment, herbal consultation or 30-minute bodywork session. These appointments can be booked online at http://www.fivepointholistichealth.com/schedule-now/ by choosing “Community Referral Promotion” as the service. At the end of the booking process you will be prompted to enter “Sage” as the referred business. Appointments can also be booked over the phone at 773-466-9882.

Chicago Women’s Health Center
Sessions with student interns starting at $20

Pacific College of Oriental Medicine
Sessions with student interns for $35 and under

Sonya Seifert and Jennifer Wade will continue to offer individual and community acupuncture at Bluebird Wellness, which will open in the spring and be located near Irving Park and Pulaski just one block from the blue line, Metra, and the Kennedy expressway. Please call Sonya at 773-844-5709 or Jennifer at 773-406-2091. Their website will be www.bluebirdwell.com and email is bluebirdwell@gmail.com.

January 2, 2016   Posted by: sageadmin

Sage’s Timeline and Next Steps

After five transformative and healing years, Sage will be ending services at this location on March 15th, 2016.

Below is our timeline moving forward:

January 2nd – March 15th: Services will continue, and all outstanding gift certificates must be redeemed.

April 1 – April 30th: The office will be under construction as Essential Acupuncture Chicago prepares to move into this office. Stay tuned for skillshares and a closing celebration for Sage Community Health Collective.

May 1st: Essential Acupuncture Chicago begins services at 2514 W Armitage Ave. #205

January 7, 2015   Posted by: sageadmin

Repurposing Household Items for Environmental Stewardship

Repurposing Household Items for Environmental Stewardship

by Stephanie Camba

Because the earth and creativity, I would like to share some tips about DIY projects, repurposing household items, and examples of how I have applied them in real life. This isn’t a how-to-do as much as it is a how-to-(re)think post. There are many resources you can google for most projects, but thinking outside the box for what our material haves/needs/wants and where to get them/how to make them is a way of life and an unlearning/mind shifting I hope we can promote and practice together.

Things to ask yourself or think about before reusing materials and creating DIY projects:

i. Do I really need to buy a new thing? Do I really need to throw this old thing out or is there a way I can repurpose, recreate this thing?

Observe the shape and sizes of items you may be getting rid of. From furniture, clothing, plastic and glass containers/bottles, cardboard, paper (flyers, pamphlets, etc.).

ii. Is this safe?

Consider whether what you are creating is stable and also healthy. For instance, reusing plastic containers for food have risks of leaking plasticides and chemicals into your food. Do your research, especially when working with plastic and anything that might not be made of sturdy material.

iii. Are there resources out there that can help me do this?

    There are countless blogs, websites, and how-to videos and instructions online.

iv. Do I have the proper tools and materials for this project?

This also includes thinking of ways to complete your project with the least spending. Perhaps you can be creative with the tools you use if the resources you find suggest using something you don’t have.

v. Enjoy the process

Creating can be a slower process than just buying, but it can be very rewarding and liberating when you don’t need to depend on spending and to see that you’ve created something new with things you already have instead of creating more waste and harm to the earth. You’re not only giving to yourself and those around you – you are finding ways to live a more just (if not, just crafty and creative) life. Go you!

Reimagining furniture: Dresser turned shelf, Updating tables
This is a broken dresser that I converted into a shelf just by stacking the drawers on top of each other. I painted the light brown edges a dark gray to for a subtle look. However, for furniture updates make sure they are safe and will not pose harm to people you live with or guests, particularly smaller, younger, cuter humans who are still developing fine motor skills :)

dresser

I found the coffee table below by the dumpsters.

I found this table at a thrift shop.

Then I had a heArt warming potluck and painting party with friends to bring good energy, warmth, and color into my home.

What you see is what we collectively created.

table2

And you can repurpose so many other items!

Glass bottles, oh the many uses! (all those pillows except for one was thrifted from Green Element, too :) cleaning supply holder water bottle to use on a daily basis (instead of buying plastic bottles) paint brush/water holder vase (you can paint it or put ribbons, too!)

Glass bottles, oh the many uses! (all those pillows except for one was thrifted from Green Element, too :)
cleaning supply holder
water bottle to use on a daily basis (instead of buying plastic bottles)
paint brush/water holder
vase (you can paint it or put ribbons, too!)

 

Old flyers/paper items/boxes Turn them into bookmarks. Here are some incense boxes, flyers, and cardboard (not shown) I’m turning into bookmarks. Sturdier material such as boxes can also be used for creating stencils that people of all ages can enjoy. You can also cut up flyers and glue paper on it to personalize a note for a friend as a gift or a reminder of the cool event/action/artist/imagery you both like. Old cardboard can also be repurposed to create stencils.

Old flyers/paper items/boxes
Turn them into bookmarks. Here are some incense boxes, flyers, and cardboard (not shown) I’m turning into bookmarks. Sturdier material such as boxes can also be used for creating stencils that people of all ages can enjoy. You can also cut up flyers and glue paper on it to personalize a note for a friend as a gift or a reminder of the cool event/action/artist/imagery you both like. Old cardboard can also be repurposed to create stencils.

 

Plastic containers If you happen to buy food at the store or order to-go, keep the plastic container for alternative uses. This is tricky because of plasticides and other chemicals, so I recommend limited use for food storage/re-storage and definitely not reheating the plastic container. Here’s a way to use store bought cupcake containers for mixing paint.

Plastic containers
If you happen to buy food at the store or order to-go, keep the plastic container for alternative uses. This is tricky because of plasticides and other chemicals, so I recommend limited use for food storage/re-storage and definitely not reheating the plastic container.
Here’s a way to use store bought cupcake containers for mixing paint.

 

Shirts Use the excess clothing as a handkerchief instead of using tissues or as rags for cleaning, removing make up, art projects, etc. You can also sew them into pillowcases.

Shirts
Use the excess clothing as a handkerchief instead of using tissues or as rags for cleaning, removing make up, art projects, etc. You can also sew them into pillowcases.

Now go, live, create and participate in the world as justly as you possibly can with what you have!

///

Stephanie “Soultree” Camba(nationofthangs) has been a lifelong poet coming out of family reunion and emergency room stages to rallies and community spaces. She has sought refuge and redemption in her rhymes and is now using her craft to also restore and rebuild inward as well as outward.

Soultree is…

human,
an independent artist driven by causes and community,
an organizer and performer with Elephant Rebellion, an artist collective that uses their skills to empower youth and community,
a member of the Escolta St. Snatcher’s Social Club, an artist collective that uses visual arts to reclaim, decolonize and restore Pilipino culture and herstory,
an organizer with the Immigrant Youth Justice League, a grassroots organization that does the most.com/immigrantrights/holisticjustice,
a lover of community constantly fighting for self-determination and respective liberations with pen, poem, music, and story as weapons of choice

Repping Chicago hard by way of Majuro, Marshall Islands, by way of Manila, Philippines, by way of stars that aligned in my mother’s womb and wishes and the journey continues. Join Soultree on this musical and artistic learning, living, loving experience.

 

January 6, 2014   Posted by: sageadmin

Become a Member of Sage!

What is the membership program?

Sage’s Community Health Collective Membership program offers trauma informed, body positive and harm reductionist healing services and self care tools to organizations, families, and affinity groups at an affordable group rate.

What are the benefits of purchasing a membership?

The purpose is to give groups an opportunity to invest in self care and the sustainability of their organization and community. Groups who buy a membership receive 10 sessions of a healing tool offered at Sage by professional skilled practitioners. Along with a complimentary self and community care workshop for each organization that becomes a member.

Who can apply?

Any group of 5 or more can apply to become a member. We strongly encourage non-profit organizations, community based organizations and grassroots groups doing community organizing to address systemic injustice in Chicago to apply.

The membership can also be split up among families or a group of friends.

(see  information below on rates)

What healing services are available?

Once your organization chooses a membership package and divides it up among the members folks affiliated with the group or organization are then able to access the following services:

  • 30 minute bodywork session: Bodywork is a way of referring to Asian Body Therapy, a healing practice based in Traditional Chinese Medicine. At Sage, our bodywork includes various massage techniques, such as shiatsu, tui na, deep tissue massage, Thai massage, cupping, gua sha, and acupressure. You will relax on a comfortable massage table and you may experience a physical and emotional release. Bodywork may include gua sha or cupping.
  • 1 hour Community Acupuncture Session: In community acupuncture we are able to provide a quality acupuncture experience in a group setting. You will be seated in a comfortable reclining chair in our community acupuncture space. You will be paired with one of the available acupuncturists. The community acupuncture sessions typically last an hour, which includes a short intake, a discussion about your health goals with the acupuncturist, and your treatment.
  • 30 minute nutritional or herbal consultation: Herbs and Eastern Nutrition have been used in Chinese Medicine for over 2000 years and can be used to treat all patterns in Chinese Medicine. According to Chinese Medicine and Eastern Nutrition, everything you ingest has a flavor and temperature, which causes your body to react. During your appointment, we will review your current nutrition practices and make detailed suggestions that you can incorporate to keep your body in balance. An herbal formula and/or an Eastern Nutrition plan may be recommended. We currently offer patent formulas, which are pre-made formulas containing many herbs in the form of capsules or pills. Chinese formulas contain many herbs because they address many organ systems in your body and treat your individual pattern of imbalance as well as your symptoms.

Workshops

We have a number of workshops available for groups looking to explore self care and community care tools. Workshop range from more hands on tools like guasha, abdominal health, ear seeds, and acupressure and Qi-gong meditation to pop ed style activities and discussion around self care in social justice movements. The self care workshop explores questions like: How do we take care of each other in the movement? And How to we take care of ourselves in order to be sustainable in social justice work?

How much does it cost?

 We have different options for different sized organizations.

Please see a list of costs and benefits and choose which size you think best matches your organization:

Small Organization: (5 or less people)

10   sessions (1 hr CA/ .5 hr bodywork /. 5 hr. nutritional or herbal consult)

1 off site workshop

Price: $350

Medium Organization: (5-15 people)

20 sessions (1 hr CA/ .5 hr bodywork /. 5 hr. nutritional or herbal consult)

1 off- site workshop of you choosing

Price: $700

Large Organization: (15+ people)

30 sessions (1 hr CA/ .5 hr bodywork /. 5 hr. nutritional or herbal consult)

1 off site workshop Price: $1050

Unit price: $35 per session. We provide the workshop free as  a membership benefit. Our workshop are normally priced at $60-100 dollars for an hour.

 Does the membership expire?

All memberships expire within 1 year of purchase.

 How do I apply?

 If your group is interested in applying for membership please email us at sagecommunityhealth@gmail.com to request a short application.

 

August 29, 2013   Posted by: sageadmin

No Drop-In NADA Friday, August 30th

We have a scheduling update: this Friday there will be no NADA drop-in ear acupuncture, however, please join us NEXT FRIDAY for another Community Care Night with the Healing Justice Network when we will be offering ear acupuncture and a variety of other donation-based services! We hope you all have wonderful weekend!

May 30, 2013   Posted by: sagepage

A is for Asparagus!

This summer, Sage is featuring fruits and vegetables that we love for their healing properties. Stay tuned for the virtual feast!

A is for Asparagus!

Raise your hand if you love asparagus!!! It’s a perfect vegetable for spring, the season of Wood in Chinese Medicine. It clears heat and invigorates the blood. Nutritionally, it is high in folate and a good source of Vitamin C and beta carotene. It also contains glutathione, a phytochemical that has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. It also contains inulin, a carbohydrate that increases the bacterial flora in the gut!

Intrigued? Ina Garten’s got a recipe for you!

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/roasted-asparagus-recipe/index.html

 

May 6, 2013   Posted by: sagepage

Tools for Community Care Within Organizational Culture

Tools for Community Care Within Organizational Culture

by Stacy Erenberg

For the past year and a half I have been doing workshops around self and community care within various community organizations. Some of them are social services, some of them are grassroots organizing groups of various sizes and political affiliations, all are groups that are working to make social change, all with practitioners who are exhausted and working through levels of burnout and are asking themselves the questions, “After taking care of myself how do we take care of each other, what does community care look like? How do we lift up community care and self care and still have community accountability?”

For a long time I was struggling with the answer to that question myself. I never assume to know all the answers and am constantly humbled at how much I learn from the participants in our workshops. It was hard for me to accept my position as a person who has had enough experience doing healing justice work that I just might have some concrete examples/suggestions of how to do the work.

I would do these pop-ed style workshops and always get asked the same questions I mentioned above. I was waiting for some magic answer, some magic equation tool or pedagogy that would give me the answers to all those questions. It wasn’t until last year at a healing retreat that I facilitated in Michigan with three organizers from Chicago that I realized we do have a lot of tools right in front of our noses and that many brilliant organizations, organizers, groups and individuals are employing these revolutionary ideas, practices, space and love into their organizations all the time.

Therefore I created a list (see below) of some of these concepts and tools. It’s not a static list. The list is meant to be challenged and expanded. Some of the items on this list are tools that we use internally at Sage and some of them are tools that I have heard from folks from the workshops I have facilitated over the years that seem to be successful.

They are all related to this idea of  healing justice, which is a practice that aims to collectively respond to and intervene on the impact of violence and oppression and how it manifests itself in our minds, bodies and our spirits. We can bring these healing justice community care tools into our organizations and movement work. Here is what some of that change might look like.

  • Lovingly challenging each other in collective spaces

  • Creating safe space via anti-oppression work, consensus decision making, having a grievance policy

  • Doing political education with staff and members

  • Creating organizing principles at the beginning of projects

  • Getting trained in peace circles and ethical communication

  • Having mutual accountability agreements and ways to hold each other accountable in loving ways

  • Interrupting racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism, classism, transphobia and all other forms of oppression

  • Using Peace notes and peace circles as a tool for healing

  • Offering comp time and sabbaticals to employees

  • Offering child care for staff and members of your orgs.

  • Offering or doing group yoga

  • Offering group packages for acupuncture and bodywork clinic

  • Offering health care or self care packages/monies which include access to mental health services

  • Periodic group healing sessions

  • Long check-ins where staff can put themselves on the agenda when need be

  • Intentional conversations about healing from internalized oppression — recognizing it exists and naming it as trauma that affects our work

  • Integrating healing justice into the curriculum for leadership development

  • Adding a self care line item to your budget, even if it’s really small in the beginning

Each group can create what collective healing looks like for them. A lot of these things people are inherently doing all the time. These are not these prescribed, movement, jargony terms. They are just ideas and practices from people who are currently entrenched in the system that doesn’t facilitate collective healing. These are ideas I have seen and actually experienced first hand that totally facilitated collective healing, and it’s been really beautiful. I look forward to learning and sharing more tools.

What tools have you and your organization developed to promote self care and community care? Share your thoughts and ideas with us! Email us at sagecommunityhealth@gmail.com!

Stacy Rene Erenberg is a community organizer, activist healer and socially conscious musician. For the past 12 years Stacy has worked with youth and other change makers fighting for equal education, ending gender violence, immigration reform and racial justice. Through her diverse experience working with all walks of life, she has gained skills as a facilitator, participatory action researcher, youth worker, popular education facilitator, advocate and cultural worker. Stacy was born and raised on the North east side of Chicago. She dedicates her life to justice through organizing, healing arts and music.Currently, she is the co-founder and practitioner at Sage Community Health Collective. Through her work at Sage, Stacy is committed to providing affordable, harm reductionist and preventative healthcare and access to healing practices for all.Stacy’s healing practice is a mixture of Tui Na, which is Chinese Massage that includes stretching, pulling, and acupressure, Shiatsu Meridian Therapy and Reiki. Stacy is a Reiki Level II practitioner and a certified Asian Body Therapist. Stacy believes that the way people move and the chronic pain they suffer from often is a result of a collection of traumas that the body has experienced over a lifetime. Therefore, her approach to healing the body and the entire being is to incorporate energy work into her practice to address the emotional and energetic healing of her patients. Each bodywork treatment Stacy gives is unique to that particular person and their own story and needs. Because of her deep conviction that the “personal is political “and that our individual healing process is deeply connected to the collective struggle; she specializes in providing healing services to community activists, organizers, social workers and teachers who are on the front lines of fighting for a more just world.At Sage aside from being a practitioner, she is the Outreach Coordinator and Internal Development Coordinator. She facilitates regional and national healing justice movement building for Sage and works with the other Sage members to address and heal their own internalized oppressions.In her free time Stacy likes to sing and write songs, practice the guitar, do crossword puzzles, and read historical novels and memoirs. She also enjoys hanging with friends and family, decompressing with her partner by watching bad T.V, laughing out loud and dancing it out on a regular basis.All of these things, she says, “nourish my spirit and help me feel whole.”

For information on her upcoming performances and work outside of Sage, visit www.stacyrene.com

 

March 14, 2013   Posted by: sagepage

Meet Aidan! Our Newest Bodyworker!

Aidan Starr, LMT is a massage therapist with firm roots in self empowerment, consent and holding space for people where they are at in the moment. Positivity for all bodies and genders, gentle growth and sustainability are at the foundation of his practice. A graduate from Soma Clinical Massage School, Aidan completed training in myofascial release, stress reduction, deep tissue massage, trigger point therapy, and hydrotherapy. He may also incorporate aromatherapy and/or reiki, depending on the individuals needs.

To schedule with Aidan on Sundays or every other Monday, call Sage Community Health Collective at 312.582.4458

 

March 5, 2013   Posted by: sagepage

Sage March Newsletter!

In our March Newsletter we say goodbye to our dear friend and Community Advisory Council Member, Dr. Aparna Sharma.

Also, check out our newsletter for updates on March events and new practitioners at Sage.

February 28, 2013   Posted by: sagepage

Sage Has a New Phone Number!

Please update your records! We have a new phone number! 312.582.4458

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